AWS Security Profile: Rustan Leino, Senior Principal Applied Scientist

Original Post from Amazon Security
Author: Supriya Anand

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I recently sat down with Rustan from the Automated Reasoning Group (ARG) at AWS to learn more about the prestigious Computer Aided Verification (CAV) Award that he received, and to understand the work that led to the prize. CAV is a top international conference on formal verification of software and hardware. It brings together experts in this field to discuss groundbreaking research and applications of formal verification in both academia and industry. Rustan received this award as a result of his work developing program-verification technology. Rustan and his team have taken his research and applied it in unique ways to protect AWS core infrastructure on which customers run their most sensitive applications. He shared details about his journey in the formal verification space, the significance of the CAV award, and how he plans to continue scaling formal verification for cloud security at AWS.

Congratulations on your CAV Award! Can you tell us a little bit about the significance of the award and why you received it?

Thanks! I am thrilled to jointly receive this award with Jean-Christophe Filliâtre, who works at the CNRS Research Laboratory in France. The CAV Award recognizes fundamental contributions to program verification, that is, the field of mathematically proving the correctness of software and hardware. Jean-Christophe and I were recognized for the building of intermediate verification languages (IVL), which are a central building block of modern program verifiers.

It’s like this: the world relies on software, and the world relies on that software to function correctly. Software is written by software engineers using some programming language. If the engineers want to check, with mathematical precision, that a piece of software always does what it is intended to do, then they use a program verifier for the programming language at hand. IVLs have accelerated the building of program verifiers for many languages. So, IVLs aid the construction of program verifiers which, in turn, improve software quality that, in turn, makes technology more reliable for all.

What is your role at AWS? How are you applying technologies you’ve been recognized by CAV for at AWS?

I am building and applying proof tools to ensure the correctness and security of various critical components of AWS. This lets us deliver a better and safer experience for our customers. Several tools that we apply are based on IVLs. Among them are the SideTrail verifier for timing-based attacks, the VCC verifier for concurrent systems code, and the verification-aware programming language Dafny, all of which are built on my IVL named Boogie.

What does an automated program verification tool do?

An automated program verifier is a tool that checks if a program behaves as intended. More precisely, the verifier tries to construct a correctness proof that shows that the code meets the given specification. Specifications include things like “data at rest on disk drives is always encrypted,” or “the event-handler always eventually returns control back to the caller,” or “the API method returns a properly formatted buffer encrypted under the current session key.” If the verifier detects a discrepancy (that is, a bug), the developer responds by fixing the code. Sometimes, the verifier can’t determine what the answer is. In this case, the developer can respond by helping the tool with additional information, so-called proof hints, until the tool is able to complete the correctness proof or find another discrepancy.

For example, picture a developer who is writing a program. The program is like a letter written in a word processor, but the letter is written in a language that the computer can understand. For cloud security, say the program manages a set of data keys and takes requests to encrypt data under those keys. The developer writes down the intention that each encryption request must use a different key. This is the specification: the what.

Next, the developer writes code that instructs the computer how to respond to a request. The code separates the keys into two lists. An encryption request takes a key from the “not used” list, encrypts the given data, and then places the key on the “used” list.

To see that the code in this example meets the specification, it is crucial to understand the roles of the two lists. A program verifier might not figure this out by itself and would then indicate the part of the code it can’t verify, much like a spell-checker underlines spelling and grammar mistakes in a letter you write. To help the program verifier along, the developer provides a proof hint that says that the keys on the “not used” list have never been returned. The verifier checks that the proof hint is correct and then, using this hint, is able to construct the proof that the code meets the specification.

You’ve designed several verification tools in your career. Can you share how you’re using verification tools such as Dafny and Boogie to provide higher assurances for AWS infrastructure?

Dafny is a Java-like programming language that was designed with verification in mind. Whereas most programming languages only allow you to write code, Dafny allows you to write specifications and code at the same time. In addition, Dafny allows you to write proof hints (in fact, you can write entire proofs). Having specifications, code, and proofs in one language sets you up for an integrated verification experience. But this would remain an intellectual exercise without an automated program verifier. The Dafny language was designed alongside its automated program verifier. When you write a Dafny program, the verifier constantly runs in the background and points out mistakes as you go along, very much like the spell-checker underlines I alluded to. Internally, the Dafny verifier is based on the Boogie IVL.

At AWS, we’re currently using Dafny to write and prove a variety of security-critical libraries. For example: encryption libraries. Encryption is vital for keeping customer data safe, so it makes for a great place to focus energy on formal verification.

You spent time in scientific research roles before joining AWS. Has your experience at AWS caused you to see scientific challenges in a different way now?

I began my career in 1989 in the Microsoft Windows LAN Manager team. Based on my experiences helping network computers together, I became convinced that formally proving the correctness of programs was going to go from a “nice to have” to a “must have” in the future, because of the need for more security in a world where computers are so interconnected. At the time, the tools and techniques for proving programs correct were so rudimentary that the only safe harbor for this type of work was in esoteric research laboratories. Thus, that’s where I could be found. But these days, the tools are increasingly scalable and usable, so finally I made the jump back into development where I’m leading efforts to apply and operationalize this approach, and also to continue my research based on the problems that arise as we do so.

One of the challenges we had in the 1990s and 2000s was that few people knew how to use the tools, even if they did exist. Thus, while in research laboratories, an additional focus of mine has been on making tools that are so easy to use that they can be used in university education. Now, with dozens of universities using my tools and after several eye-opening successes with the Dafny language and verifier, I’m scaling these efforts up with development teams in AWS that can hire the students who are trained with Dafny.

I alluded to continuing research. There are still scientific challenges to make specifications more expressive and more concise, to design programming languages more streamlined for verification, and to make tools more automated, faster, and more predictable. But there’s an equally large challenge in influencing the software engineering process. The two are intimately linked, and cannot be teased apart. Only by changing the process can we hope for larger improvements in software engineering. Our application of formal verification at AWS is teaching us a lot about this challenge. We like to think we’re changing the software engineering world.

What are the next big challenges that we need to tackle in cloud security? How will automated reasoning play a role?

There is a lot of important software to verify. This excites me tremendously. As I see it, the only way we can scale is to distribute the verification effort beyond the verification community, and to get usable verification tools into the hands of software engineers. Tooling can help put the concerns of security engineers into everyday development. To meet this challenge, we need to provide appropriate training and we need to make tools as seamless as possible for engineers to use.

I hear your YouTube channel, Verification Corner, is loved by engineering students. What’s the next video you’ll be creating?

[Rustan laughs] Yes, Verification Corner has been a fun way for me to teach about verification and I receive appreciation from people around the world who have learned something from these videos. The episodes tend to focus on learning concepts of program verification. These concepts are important to all software engineers, and Verification Corner shows the concepts in the context of small (and sometimes beautiful) programs. Beyond learning the concepts in isolation, it’s also important to see the concepts in use in larger programs, to help engineers apply the concepts. I want to devote some future Verification Corner episodes to showing verification “in the trenches;” that is, the application of verification in larger, real-life (and sometimes not so beautiful) programs for cloud security, as we’re continuing to do at AWS.

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Supriya Anand

Supriya is a Senior Digital Strategist at AWS.


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